Thankful Thursday – Opa’s Birthday

Yesterday would have been my maternal grandfather’s 100th birthday! Adolf Emil Haberkern was born on 11 September 1919 in Stein, Baden-Württemburg, Germany. He was the son of Karl Haberkern and Emma Sidonie Lindenmann. Opa, as he was known to us, married my grandmother in 1942 (Oma would have been 100 earlier this year), they arrived in the United States in 1952, and he died in 2009 just shy of 90 years old. Opa was gentle and funny and loved his family – especially his grandchildren. Below are a few of my favorite pictures of my grandfather. Happy Birthday Opa!

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Fall 1972

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© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Sentimental Sunday – Grandparents Day

Well, it’s been a while since my last post! The summer was filled with so much fun and travel that my blog fell of my radar for a while. Time to get back to it …

In 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed a proclamation that the first Sunday after labor day would be National Grandparents Day. So here are a few photos of grandparents and their loves from the family files …

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My Dad and his maternal grandparents, Elizabeth and Charles Merz in the early 1940s.
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My mom and her paternal grandparents, Karl and Emma Haberkern, while visiting from Germany in 1959 (for Mom’s Confirmation).
My husband and twin sister cool off with paternal grandparents, Otis and Mary Draper.
My husband and his maternal grandparents, Mary and Michael Petrun, and his sister and Mom.
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One of my favs with my paternal grandparents, Art and Agnes Cubbage, and my sister and cousins in the early ’70s (before my brother arrived).
Me and my sibs with my maternal grandparents, Adolf and Elise Haberkern. Gotta love the ’70s!
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My boys with their Grandma and cousin.
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My parents and their wild Christmas grandkids!

Happy Grandparents Day to all of the Nanas, Pappys, Omas, Opas, Pop-Pops, Grandmas and Grandpas out there!

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Sentimental Sunday – Corky’s Birthday!

maybe Cork's birthday - summer 1945 or 1946

 

Someone had a birthday this weekend! Happy Birthday to my Dad. This is a picture from Corky’s 4th birthday party! Corky is boy on the left sitting in the front, sort of looking around another boy. His brother Jeff is being held by an unknown woman.

Corky’s father was still in Norfolk in the Navy at this time, so he and his brother Jeff, and his mother (Agnes Speck Cubbage) were living on Thelma Street on Pittsburgh’s North Side with Agnes’ mother (Elizabeth Linneman Speck Merz).

Corky's brthday

 

The photos were not labeled, so I wasn’t sure of Corky’s age or the year. I was able to zoom in on this picture and count the candles … four!! The birthday party was in the backyard of Elizabeth’s house and probably included other children from the neighborhood.

maybe Cork's birthday - summer 1945 or 1946

I love this picture of Agnes looking up while she cuts the birthday cake, surrounded by all of the kids.

maybe Cork's birthday - summer 1945 or 1946

Happy Birthday Day!

 

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Happy Father’s Day!

I posted a few pictures of the Moms in our family tree. Sadly, I realized that I do not have nearly the same number of photos of the fathers in our tree. I’m not sure if the Dads were behind the camera, or there were more pictures of the mom and baby or children. So here are the few pictures that I have … and Happy Father’s Day to all the Proud Papas out there!

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My husband’s mother with her father Michael Petrun, in 1936 in Slovakia. This was the picture on his passport when they immigrated to the United States.
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My Mom and her father Adolf Haberkern, circa 1960.
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My husband’s grandfather, Otis Draper, with his father Jackson “Jack” Draper, in Bedford County, Virginia, circa 1903.
My Dad, his brother Jeff and his father Art Cubbage.
My Dad, his brother Jeff, and their father William Arthur, in New Providence, New Jersey, circa 1961. (Looks like another Hearts Tournament!)
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My grandfather, Adolf Haberkern, with his father Karl Haberkern, in New Providence, 1959.
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My grandmother, Agnes Speck, with her father Frank Speck, in Monessen, Pennsylvania, circa 1927.

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Tuesday’s Tip – Using a Draft Card to Identify a Man in a Photo

Military records are an incredible resource that can help us learn about our ancestors. Enlistment, discharge, pension, and service records, plus muster-rolls, draft cards and others, can provide valuable biographic and personal information about our family.

Some military records may even provide a physical description of the person – height, weight, eye color, hair color – which can help to paint a picture of the ancestor in the absence of photos. Draft Registration Cards for Word War I and II both collected information about the physical description of the registrant.

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My second great-uncle, William Arthur Speedy, registered for the draft in 1918 and was recorded as medium height and build with gray eyes and brown hair. During the registration for World War I, the registrant was also asked Has person lost arm, leg, hand, eye or is he obviously physically disqualified? (Specify). William’s card reads:

“Left index finger entirely gone, also 1st + second joint of second finger left hand.”

Well now I have a better picture of what William looked like! I do have one photocopy of a picture of William, but his left hand is hidden.

These physical descriptions can be helpful in identifying unknown persons in our family photos. This picture is from my grandparents’ collection. Using other pictures, we easily identified the man sitting as Christian Linneman, my great grandmother’s Elisabeth’s brother. It was possible that the man standing was one of the other brothers, probably Gerhard or George since they lived in the same town (William had moved to Chicago).

Christian & maybe a brother

George Linneman, registered for the draft in 1942 with the following card and information:

5-A G. Linneman Draft Card  5-A G. Linneman Draft Card 2

Besides learning that he was 5’ 7” and 145 pounds with gray eyes and brown hair, it was noted that he had a

“Fractured Knee-cap” and “Crossed left eye.”

George’s crossed eye is noticeable in this picture (and others) and was the key in identifying him!

Christian & maybe a brother

Be sure to check out the physical features of your ancestors on the back side of the cards. Draft Registration Cards are accessible for free on the FamilySearch website, and at subscription sites Ancestry and Fold3.

Have you used records to identify an unknown person in a photo?


SOURCES:

“United States, World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” index and images, Ancestry.com (https://ancestry.com : accessed 4 June 2018), card for William Arthur Speedy, serial no. 2298, Local Draft Board No. 14, Swissvale, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; citing World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, NARA microfilm publication M1509; imaged from Family History Library roll 1927074.

“United States, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” index and images, Ancestry.com (https://ancestry.com : accessed 4 June 2018), card for George Linneman, serial no. 1783, Local Draft Board No. 10, Monessen, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; citing World War II Draft Cards (Fourth Registration) for the State of Pennsylvania, NARA microfilm publication M1951; National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri.

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.