Sports Center Saturday – Ice Hockey

Today is the Winter Solstice, and it’s getting cold here in New Jersey. And with the change in seasons come the change to winter sports! I recently came across some pictures of my father and uncle playing ice hockey.

ice hockey 1

This is a picture of my father Corky’s ice hockey team in 1957 – the New Providence Rangers. His brother Jeff was also on the team, and the head coach was Joe Dill (wo was their next-door neighbor). The uniforms were maroon and white and had been donated by Summit High School (they were old football jerseys). My father’s thoughts on the hockey team:

“We played in a league (can’t remember the name) and games were at Branch Brook Park Arena (outdoor) in Newark on Sunday mornings – 6am (we had to get up at 3am!). The other teams were Summit Redwings, a team from Cranford and I think Chatham & Englewood. We also played some independent games with private schools like Lawrenceville & Oratory. They had their own rinks. Great Times.”

Side note: be sure to ask your family about any pictures that you have! These awesome details about the league were not noted on my grandfather’s slides – just the date.

My father lived in New Providence, New Jersey as a teenager. The Passaic River ran along the back edge of their yard. The river would freeze over in the winter and Corky, Jeff and their friends would play ice hockey there as well.

Check out the boots as goals!
Corky and Jeff on the Passaic River, 1960.
What a skater!
ice hockey 5
Fast forward around 20 years and here I am skating in the same place on the Passaic River with my sister, brother and mother.
That’s my grandfather Art, on ice skates at age 68, taking our pictures!

Happy Winter Solstice … and ice hockey season!

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Favorite Photo Friday – Mary Simko

Mary as a baby

Mary Simko was my husband’s grandmother. I love this picture of her, taken when she was probably about a year old. Mary was born on 21 November 1914 as “Maria” Simko in Creighton, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania to Michael Simko and Mary Kelovcy. She moved to Slovakia with her family in the late 1920s and returned to American in 1936 with her husband and daughter.

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Tuesday’s Tip – Collateral Relatives

Burd crop_0001.jpgI have been thinking about William Burd lately. In an assignment for ProGen (peer study group) last month, William Burd was the key that unlocked a family for my second great-grandmother. I knew that my great-grandmother, Maine Swank Cubbage, was the daughter of Charles G. Schwenk/Swank and Marian Burd. Marian was born in Connecticut in 1854-5 and married Charles in 1871 in Allegheny County.[1] I had been unable to find any records for her prior to 1870.

This is where collateral relatives – siblings, cousins, nieces or nephews – can be helpful in opening some locked family doors. Census records for the Swank and Cubbage families included a William H. Burd. My grandfather mentioned that he shared a room with “Bill Burd” as a kid. Could William Burd be related to my second great-grandmother Marian Burd? Absolutely! (or this would be a very short and boring blog post!)

Burd crop schoolAccording to a birth register, William Burd born on 28 February 1894 in Natrona, Pennsylvania, although he consistently used 29 January 1894 as his birthdate.[2] I’ll come back to that date discrepancy shortly. By the time that Bill was six years old, he lived with his widowed Aunt Marian “Mary” (Burd) Swank, as an “adopted son” with her children, Maine and Charles.[3] For most of the next 30 years, Bill lived with Maine Swank, now married to Charles Cubbage, and their children.[4]

Charles and Maine had eight children, and Bill was about 10 years older than their oldest son, Lester. Over the years, Bill was recorded on various censuses as cousin, roomer and boarder. I found a photocopy of Bill’s school record and his photo (above) with some Cubbage memorabilia (I don’t know who had the original). Bill never married and spent most of his life with the Cubbage family in Swissvale and then Monessen. He lived with them when they lost two of their children (Leah in 1920 and George in 1921) and in Maine’s letter to her sister, she mentions how upset Bill was about George’s death, “Poor Bill is taking it awful hard. he don’t cry he just groans and that is worse.”

1942 burd obituary

Bill died of influenza and pneumonia at the Cubbage home in Monessen in 1942.[5] Bill’s obituary lists the Cubbage family as his own, with no mention of his birth parents or other Burds.[6] Bill worked for many years as a foreman at the Blast Furnace at Pittsburgh Steel.

Negative ScansSo how did he help me find my second great-grandmother’s family? For starters, “Burd” is often listed as “Bird” or “Byrd” and I was having problems determining which was our family and which was the correct spelling. In Bill’s death record, Lester Cubbage named Bill’s parents as Alexander Burd and Elizabeth Ryan. Obituaries helped me connect Alexander to his sister Marian Burd, and to four other siblings in Allegheny County. These siblings led me to confirm that their parents were Alexander Burd and Main Bingham. I’ll save them for another post.

So back to Bill Burd’s date of birth – the date that he used, 29 January 1894, was the date of his parent’s marriage, a month before the date of Bills’ birth in the county register.[7] I haven’t been able to locate much information about Alexander Burd and Lizzie Ryan. Alexander was widowed by 1900, but no death record has been located.

Much is still unknown about Bill Burd’s origin and parents, yet it appears that he was well taken care of by the Swank and Cubbage families. His presence in their families led me to his Burd family and opened the door to my third great grandparents, Alexander Burd and Main Bingham!

Have you ever used a collateral relative to help you find an ancestor?


SOURCES

[1] 1870 U.S. census, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, North Versailles Township (McKeesport Post Office), p. 20 (penned), dwelling 137, family137, Mary Bird in Isaac Mason household; digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 October 2019), citing National Archives microfilm publication M593. Also, Western Pennsylvania Genealogical Society, compiler, Marriage Returns, City of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1870-1875, Volume 3, (Pittsburgh: The Society, 1999), 83.

[2] “Birth record index, 1893-1905, to births outside the city of Pittsburgh,” Birth index, A-G 1893-1905, p. 76, William Bird, digital images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 28 October 2019); citing Allegheny County Clerk of the Orphans’ Court, FHL microfilm 7902608, image 77 of 371.

[3] , 1900 U.S. census, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Pittsburgh Ward 22, Enumeration District (ED) 261, sheet 7-A, p. 270 (stamped), dwelling 102, family 114, William Burd in Mary A. Swank household; digital image, Ancestry.com (httpa://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 October 2019), citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 1362.

[4] 1920 U.S. census, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Monessen Ward 2, Enumeration District (ED) 154, sheet 5-A, p. 207 (stamped), dwelling 48, family 89, William Burd in Charles A. Cubbage household; digital images, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 October 2019), citing National Archives microfilm publication T625, roll 1666.

[5] Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate no. 16957 (1942), William Harrison Burd; Bureau of Vital Statistics, New Castle.

[6] “William Harrison Burd,” obituary, The Monessen Daily Independent (Monessen, PA), 19 February 1942, p. 3, col 6; digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 October 2019).

[7] “Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950,” Marriages, v. 28, no. 17754, Ryan-Burd, 29 January 1894, digital images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 28 October 2019); citing Allegheny County Courthouse, Pittsburgh.

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Military Monday – Art’s Discharge from the Navy

This is the final post in a recent series about my grandfather’s Naval service during World War II. Art Cubbage received his Honorable Discharge from the US Navy on 9 April 1946, just short of two years from when he was inducted. At the time of his discharge, Art was a Yeoman Second Class.

2eaed-19462bhonorable2bdischarge2bnavy

Art’s Naval Separation papers had a wealth of information about him at the time, including his address and occupation, both before and after his service, schooling, and Naval insurance and pay.[1]

6c251-19462bnaval2bseparation2bpapers

During Art’s time in the Norfolk, Camp Shelton and the other 3 bases in the area were partially “inactivated at the end of hostilities of WWII” and were later consolidated into one installation named the Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek.[2] This base was commissioned on 10 August 1945. This was during Art’s time of service and I wonder if he attended the commissioning. Little Creek was designated a permanent base in 1946.

Military Monday - Art's Discharge from the Navy

Military Monday - Art's Discharge from the Navy

Art’s wife Agnes went to Norfolk at the time of his discharge. Above are pictures of Art’s Naval housing and a picture of Agnes in front of his home during his service.

4777c-april2b9252c2b1946
I love this picture of Agnes and Art (except that his eyes are closed!). I found it in a folder from The Windsor House, a restaurant in Norfolk. The date written on the back of the photo is 9 April 1946 – the same date as Art’s discharge. I can imagine my grandparents enjoying a nice dinner together after being apart for two years.

1947 Cubbage Address

 

After his discharge, Art went to Pittsburgh and then back to Akron with his family. They lived at Hillwood Homes, which was housing for Veterans, and Art worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad again.

 

 


SOURCES:

[1] Notice of Separation from U.S. Naval Service, William Arthur Cubbage, 2C USN-I(SA), 9 April 1945, USN PSC Shelton, Virginia; privately held by the author’s father, original scanned by Laura Cubbage-Draper, 2011.

[2] “Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Virginia,” Military Installations, (http://www.militaryinstallations.dod.mil/MOS/f?p=MI:CONTENT:0::::P4_INST_ID,P4_CONTENT_TITLE,P4_CONTENT_EKMT_ID,P4_CONTENT_DIRECTORY:4960,Installation%20Overview,30.90.30.30.30.0.0.0.0,1 : accessed 6 October 2017).

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Military Monday – Yeoman Art Cubbage

Military Monday - US Navy Yeoman Art Cubbage

This is the second post about my grandfather Art Cubbage’s service in the US Navy. After completing Service School Command in 1944, Art was stationed, and spent the remainder of his time in the Navy, at the Personnel Separation Center at Camp Shelton near Norfolk, Virginia.

Camp Shelton was an armed guard training center, but at the end of World War II it served as a separation center.[1] Art was a Yeoman and most likely worked in the offices at the PSC. I am pretty sure that Art is at the far right on the phone in the picture below.

Military Monday - US Navy Yeoman Art Cubbage

As a Yeoman, Art performed secretarial and clerical work. Yeomen would “deal with visitors, telephone calls and incoming mail. YNs organize files and … order and distribute supplies.”[2] As a Yeoman, Art most likely wrote or typed letters, directives, forms and reports, as well as maintained files and service records.

3537f-rating_badge_yn

The insignia the uniform of a Yeoman is crossed quills with the nibs down.

Military Monday - US Navy Yeoman Art Cubbage

In this picture of Art, you can see the insignia under the Navy eagle. There are a handful of pictures of Art and his friends and fellow Yeomen during his time in the Navy. Only a couple are marked, so we can only guess which are from Training at Great Lakes and when he was a Yeoman in Virginia. One picture is of the Fifth Naval District building, which was at the Norfolk Navy Yard. There are others that are most likely of the Norfolk area. 

Art is on the left in both pictures. The woman in the picture to the left and the man in the picture to the right show up in several of Art’s Navy pictures. I am guessing that they served together, as they both have Yeoman insignia on their uniforms.

These were probably taken at the Norfolk Navy Yard, which was about eight miles west of Camp Shelton.

While Art was stationed in Norfolk, his wife, Agnes, and sons, Corky and Jeff, moved from Ohio to Pittsburgh’s North Side to live with Agnes’ parents, Elizabeth and Charles Merz.  These are a few pictures of Agnes and the boys during that time. I wonder if she sent them to Art in Norfolk?

Next week is Art’s discharge from the Navy.


SOURCES:

[1] “Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Virginia,” Military Installations, (http://www.militaryinstallations.dod.mil/MOS/f?p=MI:CONTENT:0::::P4_INST_ID,P4_CONTENT_TITLE,P4_CONTENT_EKMT_ID,P4_CONTENT_DIRECTORY:4960,Installation%20Overview,30.90.30.30.30.0.0.0.0,1 : accessed 6 October 2017).

[2] “US Navy Enlisted Ratings,” Archive.org, (https://web.archive.org/web/20061211231100/http://navyrotc.berkeley.edu/resources/gouge/Ratings.pdf : accessed 6 October 2017).

© 2019 LAURA CUBBAGE-DRAPER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.